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LSS Webinar: Avoid Short Circuiting in the Digital Health Revolution
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Life Sciences Sector July Webinar

7/13/2017
When: Thursday, July 13, 2017
1:00 - 2:00 p.m. (Eastern)
Where: United States
Contact: Tanya Coogan
(703) 234-4109

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Life Sciences Sector Webinar

Avoid Short Circuiting in the Digital Health Revolution

Registration:  Free     

Thursday, July 13

1:00 - 2:00 p.m. (Eastern)
12:00 - 1:00 p.m. (Central)
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (Mountain)
10:00 - 11:00 a.m. (Pacific)

Program:

Digital health devices are rapidly becoming a key sector of the medical device space. This revolution begs us to understand IP and licensing issues that are being presented as a result of this newly emerging field.  In this webinar, we will explore how digital health looks today and what are some changes we can expect in the near to distant future.

Objectives:

  • Describe, from an IP perspective, how digital health companies differ from other startups;

  • Key considerations for licensing IP from or to a digital health company.

Moderator:

Michael T. Fluhler, Esq

Life Sciences Sector
Licensing Executives Society

 

Speaker:

Ashley Sloat, PhD
President
Aurora Consulting LLC
 

Ashley Sloat, PhD, specializes in creating and executing patent strategy for small to mid-sized startups predominantly in the digital health space. She gains an in-depth understanding of the technology and company vision and develops a strategy that achieves quality protection for the technology and meets budget goals.

Ashley is a registered patent agent with the USPTO. She joined Aurora Consulting shortly after its inception (as Hudak Consulting Group) and has performed several key roles in the firm - from backend administrator to client-facing patent strategy specialist to owner. 

Ashley earned her Ph.D. (summa cum laude) in the biomedical sciences from the University of Michigan. In addition to her research in immune-mediated disorders, Ashley also worked as a technology transfer fellow in the Office of Technology Transfer at the U of M.  There she analyzed nascent technology for commercialization potential (marketability, challenges, competitors, potential licensees) and patentability. During this time, Ashley authored or contributed to 11 peer-reviewed publications, presented at over 30 research conferences and meetings, acquired over $25,000 in research funding, and served as an Associate Editor for Faculty of 1000, where she reviewed and highlighted cutting edge research in the biomedical research space.

After earning her Ph.D., Ashley served as a patent infringement researcher for the U of M and a regulatory writer for an Ann Arbor-based, early stage pharmaceutical company, in particular, drafting documents for approval by the European Medicines Agency. 

Ashley obtained her B.S. (summa cum laude) in Microbiology (emphasis in biotechnology, chemistry, and Spanish) from North Dakota State University. During her time at NDSU, Ashley researched asthma and T cell leukemia in mouse models.